Triphasic Training Principle #13

Authored by: Cal Dietz & Jesper Mårtensson

The Dynamic Power Potentiation Cycling Method (DPPC) is a New Principle just discovered using a training approach that focuses on enhancing muscular power through a specific sequence of Potentiation exercises. This method incorporates dynamic movements and potentiation techniques to optimize the recruitment of muscle fibers and increase power output.

During this training, individuals perform a series of exercises in a specific order to elicit a potentiation effect. The sequence involves alternating between overcoming isometrics, and working agonist-antagonist muscles. This combination aims to prime the muscles for enhanced performance in subsequent muscle groups.

The overcoming isometrics utilized in this method can include exercise complexes such as 1) Bench & Chest Supported Row, 2) Squat & RDL. These exercises aim to activate the muscle groups involved in generating power and recruit a high number of fast-twitch muscle fibers, which forces the antagonist muscle involved to relax. This is important when it comes to training athletes because we know that advance athletes are the ones that relaxes the muscles the fastest.

Isometric contractions involve static muscle contractions without any visible joint movement. These isometric holds are strategically placed to create a potentiation effect, capitalizing on the increased neural drive and muscle activation. The isometric holds can be performed at specific joint angles or in specific positions related to the subsequent exercise to maximize their impact.

By incorporating overcoming isometric in a cycling pattern, this method aims to enhance the body’s ability to generate power by exploiting the physiological phenomenon of post-activation potentiation. This phenomenon refers to the temporary increase in muscle force production and neural activation that follows a maximal or near-maximal muscle contraction. See figure below.

Figure 1. Displacement and relaxation of the latisimus dorsi, measured with a Tensiomyography.

The muscle that was measured was the latisimus dorsi. As demonstrated in the graph, the peak displacement is 5.5 mm, which demonstrates the potentiation effect of the DPPC. However, the most interesting finding is how fast the muscle relaxes. The relaxation time with is DPPC 70 ms compared to 140 ms with a dynamic bench at 70% of 1 RM. By performing the DDPS method you get the potentiation effect without building up muscle tonus.

 

Perform the DPPC before each set. The protocol for the DPPC method is as follows:

This is what some examples would look like

Example exercises are below

Enhancing Power with the Clark 105 Torque & Belt Squat Power Potentiation Cycling Method

Coaching Tips for the Demonstrated Exercises:

In the first movement, focus on executing the Clark 105 Torque. Engage your hip flexor muscles on the back leg, exerting pressure against the pad and generating a squeezing sensation. Activate your hamstrings and glute muscles on the front leg to press against the pad, also creating a squeezing sensation. Remember to repeat this sequence on both sides.

Moving on to the second movement, perform a squat with precision. Apply force through your quads, driving your legs down into the ground.

Clark 105 Torque Dynamic Power Potentiation Cycling Method

Coaching Points to the video below
In the first movement, the athlete is performing the Clark 105 Torque. Engage your hip flexor muscles on the back leg to press against the pad, creating a squeezing sensation. On the front leg, activate your hamstrings and glute muscles to press against the pad, also producing a squeezing sensation. Repeat this on the opposite side.

Coaching Points to Video Below 
In the first movement, the athlete is performing a squat. Push the legs down into the ground using your quads.
In the second movement, the athlete is performing an RDL. Straight the legs out, using the glutes and hamstrings.

While you have the flexibility to create your own working principle, presented below is the cycling principle for your reference. 

  1. Overcoming Isometric Agonist x1 Second Max Isometric
  2. Overcoming Isometric Antagonist x1 Second Max Isometric
  3. Overcoming Isometric Agonist x1 Second Max Isometric
  4. Overcoming Isometric Antagonist x1 Second Max Isometric
  5. Overcoming Isometric Agonist x1 Second Max Isometric
  6. Overcoming Isometric Antagonist x1 Second Max Isometric

This protocol should be followed before your initial set. For the subsequent sets, reduce the number to two instead of three.

 

The Dynamic Power Potentiation Cycling Methods can be utilized by athletes, strength trainers, or individuals seeking to improve power-related activities such as sprinting, jumping, or explosive movements in their respective sports or fitness goals. It is important to note that this training approach should be implemented with proper guidance and progression to ensure safety and effectiveness.

 

This is how DPPC could be incorporated on a Lower Body day:

  1. DPPC Lower Body x1 Cycle 
  2. Back Squat x4 Reps
  3. Reverse Hyper SL OC DA x10 Reps
  4. Sprint Start 10 m
  5. Depth Jump x3 Reps ea
  6. Primetime STL Start 10 m

 

This is how DPPC could be incorporated on a Upper Body day:

  1. DPPC Upper Body x1 Second 
  2. Bench Press x6 Reps
  3. Low Cable Row SA Contra x8 Reps ea
  4. Push Up Bnd Crs-Crwl Accl x4 Reps ea
  5. Slam MB Right Foot Staggered OH x3 Reps

See the video below for a complete DPPC Upper Body method

These are the top choices for upper body DPPC in this order, the first two are the cross crawl concept:

This video is another option

Coaching Points to video below 
In the first movement, the athlete is performing a bench press. Push the bar against the pins, using the chest.
In the second movement, the athlete is performing a row. Pull the handles, using the lats.

See the video below for a complete DPPC Lower Body method example 1.

See the video below for a complete DPPC Lower Body method example 2.

Coaching Points to video below
Front leg: Push down into the ground, using your quad.
Rear Leg: Drive the leg back into the pad, using your glute and hamstring

 

The implementation of the Dynamic Power Potentiation Cycling principle, along with the concept of Triphasic Training Principle-12, which is Performance Pattern Cycling, introduces a groundbreaking approach to performance enhancement of athletes at all levels. 

Here’s a valuable insight for coaches seeking to enhance their athletes’ speed: consider incorporating the (DPPC)  lower body exercises into speed development training. This strategic addition can unlock tremendous potential for optimal performance improvements. This method may not stop at just Performance cycling and running!!!!! HAHA

This method can be easily implemented with minimal equipment, making it a simple and efficient solution.

There are several reasons why this method works astonishingly well, but alas! I won’t divulge everything just yet. Rest assured, in the near future, the reasons will be revealed. The only reason for this is we have to beware, for there are vultures lurking on social media, possessing vast information but little wisdom. They may plunder and share remarkable tidbits, but beware, for they are but imposters of originality. True honesty lies in disclosing the modifications they wrought upon the information they disseminate, misleading us from its genuine source. We consider including them in a blog post,which may make them they might feel a bit uneasy if they see their past being brought up! HAHA

Dynamic post-activation potentiation protocol improves rowing performance in experienced female rowers

Post-activation Potentiation Versus Post-activation Performance Enhancement in Humans:

Postactivation Potentiation: Practical Implications in The Collegiate Setting

Effects of isometric and dynamic postactivation potentiation protocols on maximal sprint performance

Research done by Jesper Mårtensson